Moving From A Clearomizer To An RDA

Posted on Mar 03, 2015. 0 comments

Though there are clearomizers in today’s market that allow users to receive a resemblance in the experience one would receive from an RDA (Rebuildable Dripping Atomizer), it still can not compete with the performance that an RDA has the ability to deliver.  If you’re used to a clearomizer, an RDA is a big step in experience and can become a huge eye opener into the way that atomizers work.  Follow along as we give you some bits of information on moving from a clearomizer to an RDA.

The Disadvantages To Using An RDA

Though rebuildable dripping atomizers are looked at as the elite product in the vaping world, like anything, they have their own set of disadvantages.  Before you dive in headfirst into a different realm of this world, we want you to know what to expect.  Below we’ll list the different disadvantages you may encounter when using this type of atomizer.


Safety:  Your safety is top priority, and when using an RDA, you’re definitely exposing yourself to potential risks if you don’t properly know how to use an RDA.  We highly recommend before attempting the use of a rebuildable dripping atomizer that you thoroughly research how they work, ohm’s law, how vital resistance level is, how to properly build a coil, what required tools you’ll need to build coils safely.


Rebuilding:  With a rebuildable dripping atomizer, you’ll obviously have to continue rebuilding the coil, instead of replacing it like you do with a clearomizer.  With clearomizers, the manufacturers build and house these coils, while with an RDA, you will be building the coils without the safety and ease of use that a replacement coils housing provides.  If you’re the type that does not enjoy being fiddly, precise or working with your hands on small objects, then you’ll become easily frustrated with rebuilding coils.


Dripping:  Rebuilding Dripping Atomizers are named in a way that you use them, where you have to manually drip into the atomizer continuously.  Clearomizers are great because they have a tank portion that holds your e-liquid and feeds your the wicking material as the liquid depletes.  A rebuildable dripping atomizer is much different.  The coil and wicking material is exposed, and there is no tank.  With that said, to continue to vaporize, you must continue to manually feed the wicking material with e-liquid so that the coil(s) have something to vaporize.  For those that are used to clearomizers, the act of continuously dripping can become a hassle, but if you sacrifice those few seconds every 5-10 pulls, the benefits are mindblowing.


The Advantages To Using An RDA


Now that you know the disadvantages to using an RDA, now we’ll tell you the advantages to using one.  It is only up to you to decide if those disadvantages outweigh the advantages.  For many, clearomizers are just easier to use and take less effort to receive a great vaping experience, but for others, they like to push the boundaries of normal and take all that the market has to offer.  There’s nothing wrong with using either, and it ultimately comes down to what you personally enjoy most.  Do not follow crowds, only your personal liking.  Below we’ll list the advantages you may encounter when using this type of atomizer.


No Limits:  When using a rebuildable dripping atomizer, there are no limits.  What we mean by this is that you are forced to vape a manufactured coil that is build at a certain resistance level, with a certain gauge or type of wire, nor are you forced to use only a certain type of wicking material.  Being that there aren’t any limits to what you can build and what you can build with, there are many experiences you can receive.  For those hardcore RDA users, they often build intricate coils and precise wicking setups to deliver the best performance.  With no limits, you are free to vape what you want, how you want.


Low Cost:  Not only were rebuildable dripping atomizers invented to give you an unbelievable performance, they were also made to reduce cost.  Many vapers aren’t very fond of the cost that is associated with manufacturer made coils for clearomizers, so RDA’s became a great alternative to help reduce the cost to continue vaping.  Since spools of wire is outrageously cheap, each coil that you build would only equal to pennies, versus two to twelve dollars per coil.  What’s even great about this is that since it is so cheap to build coils, many users can practice or perfect their builds to deliver an incredible experience, and it also allows new RDA users to give it a go and get their hands dirty without the huge expense.


Increased Performance:  When you move from a clearomizer to an RDA, the first and most immediate difference you’ll notice is that there is a large increase in performance.  Both the flavor and vapor production are intensified greatly.  



Tips To Using An RDA



We feel that it is only necessary to inform you with basic tips to using an RDA.  By informing you on these tips, you’ll save yourself a lot of hassle and frustration.


Throat-Hit:  Just like the flavor and vapor production, the throat-hit will increase as well.  This means, the throat-hit your nicotine provides will be much stronger.  In fact, the throat-hit will likely be enough to where you can’t vape it.  Most users who switch to an RDA will drop their nicotine level.


High VG E-Liquid:  When using an RDA, you’ll want to look for higher VG E-Liquids or liquids that do not contain a higher percentage of PG.  Though PG is known to increase the flavor, it often seems too much when used in an RDA.  In addition, using a higher VG e-liquid will increase your vapor production.


Increased E-Liquid Amount:  When you use an RDA, you’ll typically run lower resistance coils, thus causing you to vaporize more e-liquid.  Switching to an RDA, you’ll notice that you go through more e-liquid.  Since you’re using more e-liquid and still receiving a good nicotine intake, some moderate their vaping times more than when they used clearomizers.

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